July 24, 2019

Integrity DOES Count! Why Greg Smith is Leaving Goldman Sachs

Integrity Does MatterThousands of companies around the world just love hanging the word “integrity” on the walls of their hallowed hallways.  You know…it looks good.

But in the past few years, we have seen some of most well respected companies do everything they can to grab onto the almighty dollar…anything…even if it means ripping off a client.

Today, 12-year top tier employee, Greg Smith, resigned from Goldman Sachs.  You can read his full blog post on the New York Times Opinion Page:  Why I am Leaving Goldman Sachs.  Smith is not a newbie.  He has been with the company for 12 years and has been one of their most supportive raving fan employees.  Yet today, he has had enough.  To sum it up, here is a bit of what he mentions in his post:

“It might sound surprising to a skeptical public, but culture was always a vital part of Goldman Sachs’s success. It revolved around teamwork, integrity, a spirit of humility, and always doing right by our clients. The culture was the secret sauce that made this place great and allowed us to earn our clients’ trust for 143 years. It wasn’t just about making money; this alone will not sustain a firm for so long. It had something to do with pride and belief in the organization. I am sad to say that I look around today and see virtually no trace of the culture that made me love working for this firm for many years. I no longer have the pride, or the belief.”

So many people believe today that you can plop the word “integrity” on a piece of paper or on a wall in your company’s building and not live it…no one will ever know if you are not walking your talk, following through on your promises and looking out for the best interest of your clients and employees.  But, the world has changed.  We now have the 24/7 news cycle, forums and bloggers.  And, people are just sick and tired of the greed and corruption we are seeing right and left.  Here I am…a leadership coach, and I don’t know Greg Smith, yet I have heard a few things along the way the past two years about Goldman Sachs.  While I would want to hear the other side of the story (there are always two sides to everything), Smith’s story lines up with what I have heard from some well respected national leaders.

In the United States, we wonder why we are in trouble.  The blog post Smith wrote today answers that question in spades.  Companies now think they can be greedy, rip people off, steal ideas from other companies and go after more and more money and just forget about their solid reputation.  I wonder what the men and women who founded Goldman Sachs would think if they knew what was going on.  The company was founded in 1869 on principles mentioned by Smith: teamwork, integrity, a spirit of humility, and always doing right by our clients.  Apparently, GS has fallen off the tracks according to Smith.

This should be a wake up call to every organization out there.  Not only will clients not want to do business with you when you are out of integrity, but your top talent will jump ship when they have had enough.

Just as a reminder:  If your company is “living in integrity”, you should be able to:

  • Be widely trusted by your clients and employees
  • Present the unvarnished truth on each and every decision you make
  • Walk your talk, even when no one is looking
  • Take tough stands when you notice employees doing things you know will hurt your company
  • Not misrepresent yourself for your own personal gain
  • Keep confidences
  • Under-promise and over-deliver
  • Drop your own personal agenda to take care of your clients, employees and company
  • Set personal friendships aside when making a decision (if you are making a decision that is out of integrity to protect or help a friend, you are out of integrity)
  • Admit and own your mistakes publicly
  • Address conflict in a direct manner and settle it in an equitable fashion
  • Openly share information that other people need

Today, I encourage everyone reading this post to perform an integrity check by asking yourself this question:

Am I walking my talk, or are my words just empty words that look good on paper?

Thank you to Jeannette Paladino of Write, Speak, Sell for sending me this post.  She is a long-time New York City gal (and amazing blogger), and she always is on the lookout for me.  Thanks Jeannette for sending this along!

 

 

 

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Why Are We Bad at Picking Good Leaders?

Jeannette Paladino of  Write, Speak, Sell sent me a great article on CNN Opinion which addresses a new book: Why Are We Bad at Picking Good Leaders? A Better Way to Evaluate Leadership Potential.

I cannot wait to download this book and go through it.  The CNN article really hits the nail on the head when they went ahead and answered the question:  Why are we so bad at picking good leaders?

CNN Opinion:

“The short answer is, we focus on all the wrong things, like a candidate’s charm, their stellar résumé or their academic credentials. None of this has any bearing on leadership potential. And despite claims to the contrary, even a candidate’s past results have little bearing on whether the promoted individual will succeed once promoted”. It is this realization that has resulted in many organisations adopting a more collaborative way of working. Large corporate entities are displacing traditional rigid hierarchies and implementing a shared office scenario where CEO’s can working alongside managers and those further down the pecking order. This transparency is leading to more succinct and effective communication strategy whist boosting morale and ownership.

The article and the book go on to talk about the true qualities of a great leader.  We have a huge political election coming up in November, and I encourage everyone to look beyond the charm, good looks and resume to look at the strength of the candidate’s character, their ability to truly lead during this most critical time for our economy and their willingness to stand strong in the face of adversity and make a tough call, even if it means becoming unpopular.  Running for the highest office of our country is not a beauty contest…it is a tough race to put a true leader in office who can pull Congress together and get everyone moving into new territory so that we can truly thrive again as a nation.

Thank you Jeannette for sending this article and the book to me.  Looks like I am going to love this book!

 

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The Politics of American Innovation Today by Laura Schlafly

Laura Schlafly of Career Choices with Laura

Laura Schlafly of Career Choices With Laura

I want to thank Laura Schlafly of Career Choices With Laura for submitting this great post on The Politics of American Innovation Today.

Within an organization, be it a local non-profit or an international manufacturing behemoth like Apple, we will always find individuals who are the internal politicians and influencers within any decision process.  If we have a proposal, our agenda, for some significant change then it behooves us to entice the influencers to be inclined to our idea by offering something which will be seen as a desirable advantage for them.

Similarly, but on a more global scale, the decisions that stem from the desire for companies and countries to be ever more innovative to achieve mastery of global markets, growth of emerging economies, and international political hegemony, creates tremendous pressures on a country’s leadership. I read with great fascination a recent January 21, 2012 N.Y. Times article, titled:

How the U.S. Lost Out on IPhone Work This well-researched article elicited many comments and opinions on the current state of innovation in America, which has been widely decried as having become substandard in various ways, when compared to that of China.  To me, it is an economic transition that played out in the 1960’s through the 1980’s with Japan’s path from a country of cheaply made copycat products, to a world super power producer of superior designs with high quality.

Below, I have posted the reply of one of the anonymous commenters, which I happen to align with.

___________________________________________________________________________

“We sell iPhones in over a hundred countries,” a current Apple executive said. “We don’t have an obligation to solve America’s problems. Our only obligation is making the best product possible.””

Exactly.  It is up to us as individuals and up to our government as our representatives to solve these problems. As individuals we can make sure to educate ourselves and have good skills. Our representatives need to ensure that our schools can teach such skills to those willing to learn them and to provide the type of environment where companies can succeed.

We cannot force anyone to manufacture anything here unless the environment is right. If we force companies to produce here in an unprofitable way,  soon no one will be producing here. Better, we can entice high tech companies with an educated work force, a predictable business environment, good infrastructure, and a steady tax regime. We also have to accept that we cannot out compete the world in every industry.


Let’s start by educating our kids so that they can perform engineering and design jobs. We should not lament that we do not have any 12 hour night time factory jobs where workers live on-site. We should instead prepare our children for higher value-added jobs so that they can enjoy a better life.

_______________________________________________________________________

Such are the politics involved in the selection of where to locate major production facilities in a global economy.  So much more political maneuvering occurred behind the scenes than is revealed in this article.

Laura Schlafly
Career Choices with Laura

PODCAST: The Building Blocks of Successful Innovation

Innovation is a tough process and involves many moving parts.  During this podcast, Bea Fields will present the first building blocks required for successful innovation.

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Myth Squashing Time! There’s No Need To Vote If You Can’t Seek The Truth

2012-ABC-New-Hampshire-GOP-DebateSo, here we are again…in the middle of one of the most highly contested Republican primary seasons I can remember, and I have had the right to vote now for 34 years.

Over the last few days, a few things have been taken out of context, and it’s time to give the media, the candidates and the voters a wake up call, and here it is:

1.  To the media and the candidates:  If you claim to be fair, why do you report things out of context?  Yesterday, Governor Mitt Romney delivered a speech about “firing people or companies who don’t provide great service”.  He was discussing the state of affairs with health insurance companies and that as consumers, we should have the right to “fire” an insurance company that is not providing us what we need and hire a new insurance company who can provide the services we seek” (paraphrase).  But, as always, Romney’s opponents and the media simply clipped out the section when Romney said “I like being able to fire people who provide services to me” and then started flying down the tracks with that statement in their hands claiming that during one of the worst economic eras since the great depression, Romney wants to fire people.  If that is what you are going to listen to and buy into, then don’t vote.  I am 100% for voting, unless you are a voter who does not take the time to get the full story.  Just watch this video of Romney speaking yesterday and pay close attention to how the phrase was actually used:

While he may now regret his phrasing…he is absolutely right!  If you have an employee, vendor or board member who is not doing his or her job and are hurting your business or life, then they should be asked to move on and find other work or other customers.  Every day I work with leaders in the business and non-profit sector who KNOW they have a bad apple on their team or a vendor who is slack, but they are soooooo afraid to fire anyone.  Maybe we need someone with the guts to say “Hey…you are not doing your job for the American people.  Move on!”

I am not writing this to back Mitt Romney.  I am writing it, because as a leadership coach, I cannot take things out of context and then use them, and as a leader, you cannot take things out of context or take a thin slice of a full statement and then slam a person with it.  So, I urge you to look at the full picture.

2.  To the media, candidates and the American people:  Stop calling our visionary leaders crazy, cranks and odd.  That is just again not fair.  Dr. Ron Paul has been called crazy, a crank and odd.  In 2002, he was really called crazy when he delivered this speech to congress in 2012:

So, was he crazy?  I don’t think so.  This speech is very sobering indeed.

Walt Disney was called crazy, and look at the joy and happiness his “craziness” has brought into our lives.   Steve Jobs was called “crazy” when he introduced the iPod, and our world has been forever changed because of his vision.   Dr. Paul has been trying to warn Congress and the American people since the late 1990s that we were headed for some big trouble on both foreign and domestic fronts, but everyone just said “Oh…crazy Ron…there he goes again, saying that we are going to pour money into the Gaza and Afghanastan and that we are headed for an economic meltdown.”  Paul was not crazy…he was right.  He is a smart man who closely follows and studies foreign relations and economics, and he understands that history repeats itself, moves in repeating patterns and cycles around and around the same issues:  money, religion and resources.  He has always been looking into the future, and some people just don’t have the vision to be able to really see down the road.  So, the only response is “Well…that person is crazy”…that again is just not fair, and it is not accurate.  It is hurtful.

So, I encourage you today to embrace our visionary leaders and to seek the truth…not just a sliver of truth but the full truth.  If you listen to the media and to the bits and pieces being slung around like wet mud enough, you will never get the full story.  Do your own research, get the facts straight and become fully informed before heading to the polls in November.

 

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Celebrating the Life of Steve Jobs and How He Changed Our World

Pick up the 5,000 leadership books from the past five years, and my hunch is that you may not hear in those books that Steve Jobs is considered one of the greatest leaders of our times.  People spoke often about his difficulties with people, his perfectionism and his distaste for the press.  He never finished college, had a few rocky patches in life, but that did not stop him from being one of the most celebrated geniuses of our times.

Now that Steve Jobs is no longer with us, something tells me that he will be in history books as the man who truly changed our world during the 20th and early 21st century.  While he may not have been the best people person, there are many different types of leaders, and hands down, Steve Jobs (in my opinion) is the greatest visionary leader of the past 50 years.  He did not just change the way we live and work in the United States but changed the lives of billions of people worldwide.  In my opinion, someone who changes the entire world during their lifetime is certainly someone who defines true leadership.

When it comes to leadership, being a true visionary is a gift…not many people really have it.  To get people to buy into a big, world changing vision is very tough, but not for Jobs.  After a series of ups and downs, 10 years ago, Jobs went on a quest to truly change the world when he unveiled the iPod to the world.  I remember seeing the tiny, simple, sleek, thin and sexy looking device and thought “It can hold over 10,000 songs?  That little thing…no way!  Can’t happen and wont.  And who in the world will buy it at that price?.”  Boy, was I wrong.  When I suddenly “got” that the new device could download 10,000 songs from iTunes and watched my kids going crazy downloading songs with white earbuds in their ears, I became a believer and a buyer.  I now own an iPod, iTouch, iPhone and an iPad.  I still work on a Windows computer, but I want an Apple computer…that will be the next computer I own.

To see the timeline of the innovative process of Steve Jobs, just flip through this slideshow on CNN.  Really amazing!

Many people will tell you that Steve Jobs was not the tech guy (although I do take some argument with that statement…you don’t run one of the largest technology based businesses in the world without a great deal of tech knowledge), but instead, he was the man who could see where we are all going in our hyper-connected world and knew how to bring the greatest minds together to get his futuristic ideas to work.  He knew the home computer could do more, look and feel a lot more cool and could make life simpler for everyone and people can spend time even playing games on their computers, if you’re one of those people you can even use sites like mycsgoboosting.com to improve in games as csgo faster.  He was a music lover and knew that people would love to be able to pull out a tiny device and scroll to their favorite song out of a list of 10,000 and that those songs could then be streamed into your home stereo system.  He knew that the iPhone would not just dial numbers…that it would serve as a mini computer that could be a GPS system, could turn on your lights while you were away from home, could be a barcode scanner, would eventually be able to scan credit cards and could help you find the pet of your dreams.  And, once the public fell in love with the iPhone, he knew people would want something like the iPhone in a bigger form…in the form of a tablet.  The interesting thing is this:  Steve Jobs had a way of knowing what we wanted before we knew we wanted it, and once  we had our iBooks, iPods, iPhones and iPads, we then wanted the newer version, more apps to be more efficient in life and would probably not be able live without them.  And of course, as a result of Steve Jobs’ innovative spirit, his competitors around the world tried to come up with their own ideas (which were actually copycat versions of what Jobs had already built)  to compete with the genius.  While a few of his competitors have come close, they really have not yet quite hit the mark, and Jobs was always 2 steps ahead of the rest of the world of technology.

I know the world is grieving today, but I want to encourage you all to also celebrate his life and legacy to the world.  Steve Job said it all best in his commencement speech to Stanford in 2011:

“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life,” Jobs said that day.

“No one wants to die,” he added. ”Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet, death is the destination we all share. ”

“Your time is limited,” Jobs added. ”So don’t waste it living someone else’s life. … Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.

As we grieve today, let’s all celebrate the life and legacy of Steve Jobs…and look at his words closely…Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.

Watch the video tribute to Steve Jobs on Gizmodo

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9 Leadership Lessons To Learn From The Mission to Kill Osama Bin Laden

Osama Bin Laden is deadThere is not a day that goes by that for some reason I don’t think of September 11, 2001.  I don’t know why, but I will see something, read an article or just be driving down the road, and suddenly the visions come rushing back to my memory.  While these memories are only from watching the news and reading what the journalists had to say, I just cannot shake the vision of:

  • Two planes crashing into the world trade center
  • Smoke filling the New York City sky
  • Men and women, performing the the Sign of The Cross, holding hands and jumping from 80 floors to their death…not because they wanted to die, but they had to make a choice.  Do I die from being burned to death or the quicker, more painless way of the fall either killing me instantly or injuring me to the point that I may never walk again?
  • The screams and tears as people in New York City watched this in horrid and ran from the smoke and white ash that filled the streets as if a nuclear bomb had exploded.
  • The thousands of family members who stood in shock and grief, knowing they would never see their loved ones again

I also cannot help but wonder about the people who were killed who were passengers on the planes that crashed into the building or in an open grassy field and the people who were inside the World Trade Center, simply starting their day when they went their grave either by being crushed by an airplane or flying debris or having to burn to death in flames, described by many as one of the most painful ways to die.

This sounds so dramatic, because it was and still is.  This is the reality of September 11, and the man we have to blame for it was finally put to death yesterday.  I do believe that someone like this needs to be severely punished, and it was just a matter of time.  You can run from the CIA, but you just can’t hide (although he did it pretty well for ten years).

Today, people are celebrating, and the peacemakers are as usual being critical that Osama Bin Laden’s murder was a kill mission and that violence only leads to more violence.  While this is somewhat true, all I have to say is this:  If you are an American citizen and you are criticizing our president for making this decision to go after a brutal murderer, then it is time for you to move to another country.  While I cannot stand violence, we are not talking about a person who stole a piece of candy.   We are talking about a brutal murderer and a “leader…if you can even call him that” who has given the Islamic religion a very bad reputation and a place to live called fear. I want to make clear that the people who are Islamic are not all members of this  Al Qaeda regime whose only mission seems to be to kill innocent people so that they can fly on some type of power trip, because they have been told by a higher power that the innocent must die in order to teach a lesson (or some such nonsense).  But, now, because Bin Laden did the unthinkable “in the name of Islam” the people of Bin Laden’s land have to face criticism, racism and are shunned in airports and in the public.  In my opinion, if this man were captured, it would not have been enough.  We would have captured him and then would have to drag out a trial that would last for years.  This mission was carried out in a way that all leaders should be studying today.  Here are the leadership skills I immediately see were at play during this operation…the skills which helped the mission to be achieved, and as a leader, I strongly encourage you to study this mission and learn from the skills applied:

1.  A clear mission: To kill Bin Laden.  Yes…this was a kill mission.  While there may have been a discussion around capture, this mission was to rid the earth of one of our greatest threats to humanity.  The mission was clear…not fuzzy and long written and long winded.

2. Laser focus on the mission: As the report goes, this mission to get Bin Laden has been in the planning stages for two years, and the focus has been razor sharp.

3. Responsibility. President Bush made it clear that he wanted Bin Laden “dead or alive”, and he did not accomplish that.  Unfortunately, President Obama inherited this duty, and not once has he criticized the former leadership for not capturing or killing Bin Laden.  He made this “mission critical” and obviously said “If no one else is going to do it, we are going after him, and we are going to succeed.”

4. Strategic Agility: This mission is not something that was talked about in a bar over a week-end retreat and then implemented.  I can guarantee you that every step of the process was calculated out to the very minute, the very second.  The President and the CIA met numerous times to plan out what would be one of the most historical events in our history.

5. Discretion: This mission nor the strategy were leaked.  We’ve been through that before, and the secret nature of this mission was airtight.  In leadership, there are times when you are going to need to practice the deepest level of discretion, especially when the stakes are so very high.

6. Delegation: Obama did not go into Bin Laden’s mansion and kill him.  He gave the order to the CIA and the military to do the job, and he empowered them to get the job done well.

7. Top talent placement: The mission was accomplished by a team of Navy Seals.  As you probably well know, the Navy Seals are are the U.S. Navy‘s principal special operations force and is a part of the Naval Special Warfare Command (NSWC).  They are the best of the best, and while I am sure their knuckles were white, they have been trained for years for a mission such as this one.  They knew exactly what to do.

8.  Vigilance: This mission has been planned and coordinated over a two year period.  The focus, importance and desire did not wane or waver.  To wait two years for a mission to be accomplished will send many leaders into a state of frustration, and the mission then gets dropped.  Learn from this vigilance.  Well thought out missions take time, patience and commitment.

9.  Persistence: The mission to get Bin Laden did not stop until it was accomplished.  I am sure multiple road blocks were thrown into the path, but our leaders found ways around and over those obstacles to make this mission come to fruition.

I know that this day will not bring back the thousands of men and women who were lost in 9/11 and the thousands of men and women who have been murdered by this man.  But I hope in some way that the family members of the victims of the brutality of Bin Laden will find just a bit more peace and closure knowing a man who obviously found joy in killing innocent people is no longer roaming this earth just to do it again.

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Leadership Coaching Question of the Week: Are You Truly Leading or Just Trying to Look Busy?

In the world of leadership coaching (often known as executive coaching), it is quite interesting to watch top decision makers in today’s world.  Many of our “busy leaders”  have a tendency to go on and on  about all that they are doing…running here and there, putting out fires and living in reaction mode.  As an executive coach, when I dig deeper, I often find out that what they are really spinning around about are the tiny details which truly should be reserved for someone on his team.  During a coaching session, when I ask leaders how they spend their day, here are some of the most common “distractions” I hear about.

1.  Checking email 8-10 times per day.  The mother of all leadership sins!

Solution: Check email once in the morning at 9:00 a.m. (your time zone) and again at 4:30 p.m.  If you are concerned about missing someone, simply enter an auto-responder into your email program which says “Thank you for your email.  I usually check email at 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.  If this is an emergency, you may call me at 555-555-5555 (put your telephone number in the blank).

2.  Writing other people about typos on an email,  website, a document or about subjects that are really not urgent.

Is this really your job, and did someone ask you to proofread their materials?  Probably not.  This job is usually reserved for a proofreader or an assistant in the marketing department.  As someone who types really fast, I do my best to double check my typos and my mistakes, but I don’t invest hours each day on proofreading.  If I want something proofread, I send it to someone at Roundtable Companies.  I don’t comb every blog post, because it squelches my creativity, and I am someone who does send out typos (not on purpose) on occasion by email.  If I make a mistake, I do my best to apologize for the inconvenience and correct my mistake.  As a leader, if part of your job is to notify people about their typos, then go for it.  But, I have found more often than not that this is never the job of a CEO.  This is usually a job handled by the marketing or PR arm of the company.  As a CEO, it is not your job to be the “internet police” and invest the majority of your day telling people that they have a typo on a page on their website or in an email.

3. Watching Hulu.com, You Tube, spending hours on Facebook or getting distracted by an article that leads you to another article and then to another article.

This revolving door can honestly suck hours out of your day…sending jokes to your friends, watching videos online, reading blogs and articles that have nothing to do with your business or getting on video chat with friends.  Set aside 30 minutes in the morning and 30 minutes in the afternoon to peruse two websites which are relevant to your business or target market.  The week-ends can be reserved for looking at funny dog and cat pictures and videos on You Tube or .for video chat with friends and family.

Are Your Constant Meetings Sending Your Company To An Early Death?

4.  Calling meetings on a daily basis that last for 1-3 hours.

I don’t want to say much about this other than this:  Read the book Death by Meeting by Patrick Lencioni.

5. Fixing broken technology.

I am just amazed at how many business owners and CEOs (who know very little about technology) who try to fix old, worn out, broken computers, servers and back up systems.  Hey…here’s a novel thought…maybe it’s time to regroup and replace your technology with state of the art systems.  If your computer is sluggish or if your phone continues to rattle with static, it’s time for an upgrade.  If your technological devices are not working, you may be investing precious hours fixing broken equipment that is only going to break again.  And…by all means, add an IT person to your team or outsource this job to someone who can fix your tech problems in a snap!

As a business owner, your job is to not only work in the business but on the business (famous quote by Michael Gerber).  Working on the business does not include fixing your broken 1990 computer.  For a true business owner or leader, working on the business includes (but is not limited to) the following (these are not in order of importance.  These are in alphabetical order).  It is up to you to decide what is most important and to rank these according to importance for your company:

  • Addressing tough conversations (and not avoiding them)
  • Addressing your own self development (it does not matter how high up you are in your organization or how powerful you think you might be…we all need to grow if we want to stay competitive in today’s world)
  • Being a masterful coach
  • Being a positive role model and ambassador for your company
  • Being the first to bridge the gap across generations in your company
  • Decision making when the decision moves to the top
  • Delegating to others
  • Developing boss/team/employee relationships
  • Developing command and public speaking skills
  • Driving innovation
  • Improving efficiency and time management
  • Inspiring teams and people
  • Listening without interrupting
  • Managing resources wisely
  • Meeting with Centers of Influence
  • Stepping up and standing for the use of state of the art technology and then delegating the use of technology to your Director of Information Technology
  • Strategic planning
  • Strengthening your communication skills so that everyone in your company is “on board” and know exactly what to do
  • Thinking time to clear out the junk and the cobwebs
  • Upholding the values and ethics of the company
  • Visioning
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What Can YOU Do to Make America a Better Place?

My husband, Mike and I, had the honor to host Janine Elias on her God Bless America Tour this past summer.  Janine is on a quest to do everything she can to get people on a local level to first start a dialogue about what we can do to make our local communities stronger and get back to the true values our founding fathers set forth for this great country.  Secondly, Janine is encouraging people to act….take a step to make America stronger, better and move ourselves back to a country that is respected and regarded as one of the best in the world.  Great movement for leadership coaching on a global scale.

Janine interviewed about 12 people in Southern Pines, North Carolina (my hometown).  Here is the interview with me:

You can read the entire post about her interview with me on this link.

Also, Janine is going to be moving forward with additional interviews and research on this topic, and I have encouraged her to look for angel investors.  So, if you are an angel investor or know of anyone who would be interested in a project like this one (so needed right now) contact Janine today.

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