October 20, 2017

High Schools Add Classes Scripted by Corporations in Wall Street Journal

As we have been saying for the last year…those companies who start early by reaching out to high school students (even middle school students) will be the ones who attract young talent in the future. The article, High Schools Add Classes Scripted by Corporations, in the Wall Street Journal today is reinforcing this concept. (If you cannot link to this article, go to the Wall Street Journal homepage, and scroll down to the article by the title of High Schools Add Classes Scripted by Corporations).

This brings to mind the process that the American Junior Golf Association now offers young talent to be noticed by college coaches who would normally not know about them at a very young age. My son, Jack, will be playing for the University of North Carolina starting in Fall ’08, and it is really amazing how this whole thing happened. We owe a great deal of gratitude to the AJGA and their staff of volunteers for providing the opportunity for our son to be spotted by some of the USA’s top college coaches.

When Jack was age 14, he qualified for the US Junior Amateur, and before that time, there were only a hand full of the coaches from NC who knew a tiny bit about Jack (we are not sure, but we think maybe 2 or 3 NC coaches knew that Jack was a young talent to possibly watch). But after this event, the majority of college coaches knew him by name, location, what his game was like and what he might be interested in doing (the buzz starts going around after this event). Jack had a great showing at the US Junior, and was then able to start playing in several AJGA tournaments. Over the next two years, select college coaches (who liked his game) were following him at most tournaments. While they could not talk to Jack or officially recruit him until September 1, 2007, it was obvious who was interested in him, because they always showed up as he stepped up to the tee. Over time, both the player and the family members start building a loyalty to the coaches who keep showing up (even though you have never talked to them). You know simply from their presence they are interested, and you start asking your friends and network about them, following what they are doing in the newspaper, watching their team scores online, and when it comes time to make a verbal commitment, you already know who will be a good fit for your son. It is really magical, and as I said, the process began for us when Jack was a freshman in High School.

So…as a parent who has experienced early recruiting, there is something to this article in the Wall Street Journal. If you are an employer, please take the time to read this article, and then consider how college coaches go about recruiting young talent…your presence early on can mean huge things for your company later on down the road..

Print Friendly
If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!